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Full text of "Statement for Management: Curecanti National Recreation Area"

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34 
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Curecanti 
National 
Recreation 
Area 

Statement for Management 

September 1986 



UNIVERSITY OF 6E( 

DEC 5 1986 

LIBRARIES 
DEPOSITORY 



U.S. Department of the Interior 
National Park Service 



The Statement For Management (SFM) provides and up-to-date 
inventory of the park's condition and an analysis of its 
problems. It does not involve any prescriptive decisions 
on future management and use of the park, but it provides 
a format for evaluating conditons and identifying major 
issues and information voids. 



Recommended by : 



Super/fntendent 

Curecanti National Recreati 



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Lewis & Clark N.H.T. 



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Legend 

• Locations of Major Cities 

* Locations of State Capitals 
State Boundary Lines 

T) National Park Service Areas 

National Park Service 

Historical Trails 



ROCKY MOUNTAIN 
REGION 

National Park Service 

United States Department 
of the Interior 



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DEC 84 IRMRO 



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REGIONAL MAP 

CURECANTI NATIONAL RECREATION AREA 

GUNNISON AND MONTROSE COUNTIES, COLORADO 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ■ NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 



616 I 80,007-A 
12-21-79 I RMRO 




30 kilomtare 



NEW 



MEXICO 



VICINITY MAP 

CURECANTI NATIONAL RECREATION AREA 

GUNNISON AND MONTROSE COUNTIES, COLORADO 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 



616 1 80,008 
12 20 79 IrmRO 




TO GUNNISON *- 



24 






MILES 
OMETERS 



BOUNDARY MAP 
CURECANTI NATIONAL RECREATION AREA 

MONTROSE AND GUNNISON COUNTIES 

COLORADO 

NEW MEXICO PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT Of THE INTERIOR 
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 



616 

July 86 



80,04 7 
RMRO 




I GUNNISON— -» 



LEGEND 
RECREATION AREA BOUNDARY 

U S FOREST SERVICE BOUNOARY 

COUNTY LINE 



•0» KILOIMTtRS .(Mf | 



BOUNDARY MAP 
CURECANTI NATIONAL RECREATION AREA 

MONTROSE AND GUNNISON COUNTIES 

COLORADO 

NEW MEXICO PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN 



unvicc 



I. LOCATION 

Curecanti National Recreation Area is in Colorado's 
Third Congressional District within Gunnison and 
Montrose Counties. It embraces three impoundments on 
the Gunnison River formed by the dams of the Wayne N. 
Aspinall Unit of the Colorado River Storage Project 
operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. 

II. PURPOSE AND SIGNIFICANCE 

Curecanti 's basic purpose is clearly defined in Public 
Law 485 (70 Stat. 105), Chapter 203, enacted April 11, 
1956, as follows: 

Sec. (8) ". . .the Secretary of the Interior is hereby 
authorized to construct, operate, and maintain the 
following initial units of the Colorado River Storage 
Project, consisting of dam, reservoirs, power plants, 
transmission facilities and appurtenant works:" 

Sec. (8) ". . .the Secretary of the Interior is 
authorized and directed to investigate, plan, operate, 
and maintain (1) public recreational facilities on 
lands withdrawn or acquired for the development of said 
project, or participating projects, to conserve the 
scenery, the natural, historic, and archeological 
objects, and the wildlife on said lands, and to provide 
for public use and enjoyment of the same and of the 
water areas created by these projects by such means as 
are consistent with the primary purposes of said 
projects. . .." These primary purposes are defined as 
reclamation of arid and semiarid lands, flood control, 
and generation of hydroelectric power. 

Curecanti 's basic purpose is further articulated in the 
Memorandum of Agreement between the National Park 
Service and the Bureau of Reclamation signed by 
Secretary of the Interior Udall on February 11, 1965, 
as follows: 

"Whereas the Service (National Park Service) has been 
designated as the agency responsible for carrying out 
the provision of Section 8 of the said act of April 11, 
1956;" 

Article I, "General Provisions:" 

"1. . . .Except for the areas required by the Bureau 
(Bureau of Reclamation) for construction, operation and 
maintenance of the dams, the Service shall administer 



all lands and waters within the project area, providing 
for recreation therein. . .." 

Article II, "Functions of the National Park Service:" 

"3. Negotiating the executing contracts, with private 
individuals, partnerships or corporations for supplying 
necessary visitor services related to recreational use 
of the project area, including, but not limited to, use 
of the waters for boating, canoeing, bathing, and 
sightseeing; and the prescribing and enforcing 
reasonable rates and standards for the supplying of 
such services. 

"4. Establishing and enforcing policies regarding the 
recreational use of lands and waters in the project 
area. . . . " 

"6. Establishing and maintaining protective, 
interpretive, and other facilities and services as may 
be necessary for the safe and full use and enjoyment of 
the area for recreational purposes. . .." 

III. INFLUENCES: INVENTORY AND ANALYSIS 

A. LEGISLATIVE AND ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS 

1 . Existing Factors 

The National Park Service manages Curecanti National 
Recreation Area by agency agreement as approved by the 
Secretary of the Interior. Management is adequate 
under current legislative mandates. 

Provisions affecting the establishment and 
administration of the recreation area are as follows: 

Colorado River Storage Project authorized by the 
Act of April 11, 1956, (70 Stat. 105). 

The establishment of the National Park Service by 
the Act of August 25, 1916, (39 Stat. 535). 

Act of August 7, 1946, (60 Stat. 885) authorizing 
the National Park Service to use appropriated 
funds to construct and operate facilities on the 
land under the jurisdiction of another Federal 
agency. 

National Park Service Director's memorandum of 
February 17, 1958, to the Secretary of the 
Interior setting forth the joint recommendation of 

8 



the Director and the Commissioner of Reclamation 
for management of the area approved by the 
Secretary on April 12, 1958. 

Memorandum of Agreement, based on Section 8 of the 
1956 Act (70 Stat. 1050), between the Bureau of 
Reclamation and the National Park Service relating 
to the development and administration of 
recreation on the Curecanti Unit, Colorado River 
Storage Project, signed in December of 1964, and 
concurred by the Secretary of the Interior on 
February 11, 1965. The drawing numbered 
SA-CUR-7101 which depicts the withdrawn lands for 
the Curecanti unit may be revised at any time to 
illustrate changes in the project area as a result 
of land acquisition or additional withdrawals. 
The 5-year facility construction program funded 
under Section 8 officially ended September 30, 
1984. Two ongoing contracts carried over and were 
completed during 1985. A small amount of funding 
is left to complete the loose ends of the program 
during 1986. 

A contract dated December 13, 1948, between the 
Bureau of Reclamation and the Uncompahgre Valley 
Water User's Association defining obligations in 
the operation of the Gunnison tunnel, including 
East Portal water diversion and irrigation water 
distribution conforming to the Act of June 17, 
1902 (32 Stat. 388) . 

Supplemental Memorandum of Agreement (to Agreement 
of December 3, 1948), dated April 13, 1966, and 
reaffirmed for the period ending September 1 , 
1984 , between the National Park Service and the 
Shavano Soil Conservation District concerning 
water allotment and soil and moisture conservation 
programs . 

Memorandum of Understanding (CA-1379-66-01 ) for 
the National Park Service to manage, protect, and 
develop 670 acres of Forest Service land within 
the Bureau of Reclamation withdrawal area, dated 
July 11, 1966, and reaffirmed every 5 years. 

Deed of Easement from the Bureau of Reclamation to 
the State of Colorado, Department of Highways, for 
relocation of the highway right-of-way for U.S. 



Highway 50 which runs through Curecanti National 
Recreation Area, signed February 10, 1967. 

Memorandum of Understanding with the State of 
Colorado, Division of Wildlife, for cooperative 
endeavors toward achieving proper management of 
lands and water in the State of Colorado within 
recreation areas, dated August 25, 1969. 

Contract with the Gunnison County Fire Protection 
District for structural fire suppression services 
at Elk Creek, Iola, and Lake Fork, dated 
October 1, 1980, renewable annually. 

Right-of-Way Reservation with the Bureau of Land 
Management for the construction, operation, and 
maintenance of a hiking trail, rest room, parking 
area, and picnic shelter at Hermit's Rest 
Trailhead, dated March 30, 1981. 

Memorandum of Understanding with the State of 
Colorado Division of Wildlife for the development, 
operation, and maintenance of the Dry Gulch 
Campground within the Sapinero Wildlife Unit, 
dated July 19, 1982. 

Interagency agreement between Bureau of Land 
Management, Bureau of Indian Affairs, National 
Park Service, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
of the Department of the Interior, and the U.S. 
Forest Service, Department of Agriculture, dated 
October 1, 1982, provides basis for cooperation 
between agencies on all aspects of wildfire 
management . 

Memorandum of Understanding with the Bureau of 
Land Management for the management of livestock 
grazing within Curecanti National Recreation Area 
for a 5-year term (renewable), dated May 23, 1984. 

Land-Use Permit issued by the U.S. Forest Service 
for the reconstruction, operation, and use of the 
Soap Creek Road, dated May 24, 1984. 

Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. 
Forest Service and the National Park Service 
allowing for the temporary seasonal closure of Red 
Creek and Rainbow Lake roads for the protection of 
wildlife and the prevention of road-base 
degradation, dated June 4, 1984. 



10 



Cooperative Agreement between the National Park 
Service and the Bureau of Land Management for the 
cooperative management of 4 miles of road and 
lands from Red Bridge to Gateview on the Lake Fork 
of the Gunnison River to include upgrading of the 
road, development of facilities, mitigation of 
impacts on historic resources, and placement of an 
interpretive trail and panels, signed 
September 20, 1984 (BLMNo. 1786-CO-030-83) . 

Right-of-Way Reservation with the U.S. Forest 
Service for the construction and maintenance of a 
trail (1.3 miles) and trailhead facilities (1.63 
acres) at the Crystal Creek Trail Day Use Area, 
dated April 7, 1986. 



Right-of-Way agreements (1966-2, 1984, 1985) with 
the Gunnison County Electric Association for 
overhead and buried power transmission lines in 
four locations with remaining terms of 1 to 28 
years . 

Right-of-Way agreements with Mountain States 
Telephone and Telegraph Company (1966-2, 1969, 
1982, 1983, 1984-2, 1985-2) for buried telephone 
cable in seven locations with remaining terms of 
22 to 36 years, and microwave repeater installa- 
tions in three locations with remaining terms of 3 
to 30 years. Some of these agreements were issued 
by the Bureau of Reclamation and the Bureau of 
Land Management. 

A License Agreement (1968) with Mr. Richard Oswald 
for the location of a well, pipeline, and road 
with a remaining term of 32 years issued by the 
Bureau of Reclamation prior to the National Park 
Service administering the area. 

Special-Use Permit 1379-00-6008 (1969) for Mr. N. 
Austin to locate a pump house and other structures 
on park lands with remaining term of 3 years. 

A Right-of-Way Agreement (1984) with the 
Delta-Montrose Electric Association for a buried 
power transmission line with a remaining term of 2 
years . 



11 



A Right-of-Way Agreement (1985) with Blue Mesa 
Recreation Ranch for use of a strip of land (30 
feet by 103 feet) for an access road from U.S. 
Highway 50 to their privately owned lands. This 
agreement is for a term of 30 years and is 
currently awaiting the signature of 
representatives of Blue Mesa Recreation Ranch and 
the Colorado Department of Highways. 

Concession Contract 9900C20122 (1979), including 
six amendments, between the National Park Service 
and Elk Creek Marinas, Inc., for marina services 
and showers at Elk Creek and Lake Fork and a 
restaurant at Elk Creek. The current contract 
runs through the end of December 1988. Operation 
of the tour boats on Morrow Point Lake is 
currently being provided for by annual amendments 
to the contract. 

Concession Permit 1379-05-0001 (1985) between the 
National Park Service and the Rocky Mountain News 
to provide self-vending newspaper stands through 
September 30, 1989. 

Lease Agreement (20 years) between the city of 
Montrose and the National Park Service for the use 
of a narrow gauge railroad locomotive with tender 
and caboose (used as an exhibit below Marrow Point 
Dam) , August 16, 1973. 

The Denver and Rio Grande Western narrow gauge 
trestle is included in the National Register of 
Historic Places, June 18, 1976. 

The Gunnison Tunnel was listed on the National 
Register of Historic Places in July 1979. 

The Curecanti Archeological District was listed on 
the National Register of Historic Places, 
August 15, 1984. 

Curecanti National Recreation Area operates under 
concurrent jurisdiction. 

2 . Upcoming Factors 

The Legislative Support Package initiating a bill for 
Curecanti National Recreation Area has been finalized 
by WASO and recently updated by Curecanti National 
Recreation Area and Rocky Mountain Regional Office. An 



12 



interest in the legislation was shown by Congressman 
Michael L. Strang, Colorado's Third Congressional 
District, in April of 1985. For the last few months, 
he has been considering an alternative to combine 
several areas along the Gunnison River (Curecanti 
National Recreation Area, Black Canyon of the Gunnison 
National Monument, and the lower Gunnison Gorge) into 
an area which might be called Black Canyon National 
Park and Scenic Recreation Area. 

The current Concessions Contract will be expiring at 
the end of 1988. Efforts are currently underway to 
determine which concession-provided facilities and 
services are necessary and appropriate for the upcoming 
contract. Among the items which requires careful 
consideration is the status of the tour boat operation 
on Morrow Point Reservoir. 

No comprehensive list of right-of-ways, licensing 
agreements, or other authorizing documents issued by 
the Bureau of Reclamation, the Bureau of Land 
Management, or the U.S. Forest Service for the use of 
lands now administered by the National Park Service has 
been compiled. There will be a need for such a 
comprehensive list once legislation has been passed. 

Cooperative Agreements and Memorandums of Understanding 
are being entered into as needs arise. Rights-of -Way 
and Special-Use Permits are also issued as needed on an 
ongoing basis. 

B. RESOURCES 

1 . Water Areas 

Curecanti National Recreation Area is composed of three 
lakes impounded on the Gunnison River by the Bureau of 
Reclamation as the Wayne N. Aspinall Unit 
(September 17, 1980, formerly designated the Curecanti 
Unit) of the Colorado River Storage Project. Blue 
Mesa Lake, Colorado's largest manmade lake (9,000 
acres) , is over 20-miles long with a shoreline of 96 
miles. The lake is situated in the Gunnison River 
Valley and is characterized by gentle slopes leading to 
high mesas. Morrow Point Lake (800 acres) is an 
11-mile long fiord-like lake with a 24-mile shoreline. 
Crystal Lake (300 acres) has the same appearance but is 
6 miles in length with 19.6 miles of shore at high 
water. Eleven miles of the Gunnison River are within 
the park boundary as well as 53 miles of tributary 
streams . 



13 



The recreation area manages 32,014 acres of land 
surrounding these lakes. The park staff and the Bureau 
of Reclamation need to continue to develop baseline 
data through collecting, testing, and analysis of 
biological, chemical, and physical data to effect 
better management decisions and to protect and 
ascertain the potential toxic or public health hazards 
to the visitors and the aquatic resource. The program 
is needed to provide data essential for assessing the 
acceptability of existing water quality and for 
evaluating any future changes. Priority testing and 
monitoring should be given to major inlets and 
tributaries adjacent to major developments outside the 
park. 

A determination is needed if the minimum amount of 
water that is necessary to preserve the integrity of 
the physical resources and the visitor experience — as 
well as the actual legal water rights Curecanti 
currently possesses — for recreational use facility 
service . 

2. Wildlife 

There are 51 species of mammals that make up the base 
of Curecanti 's wildlife resource. Some such as the 
Gunnison prairie dog and white-tailed jack rabbit are 
permanent residents. The prairie dog is a continuing 
management problem because of its ability to reproduce 
in large numbers, its community style of living, its 
preference for disturbed ground around visitor use 
areas, and its tendency to harbor disease vectors, such 
as bubonic plague. Other mammals, such as deer, elk, 
and bighorn sheep, use the area as a wintering ground. 
There are also some 224 species of birds that are 
either resident or migratory. Bald eagles for example 
are a winter migratory species; whereas, golden eagles 
are nesting residents. The Colorado Division of 
Wildlife has recommended the reintroduction of the 
peregrine falcon to areas within, or adjacent to 
Curecanti National Recreation Area because of historic 
sightings and because of the ideal habitat for this 
threatened and endangered species. 

Much of the information which is currently available on 
the wildlife at Curecanti was baseline data gathered 
prior to the construction of the reservoirs. No 
comprehensive studies have been conducted since. An 
inventory of small vertebrates needs to be conducted to 



14 



provide basic information on current populations as 
well as provide data-base use by which pre- and 
post -impoundment populations can be made. An inclusive 
vegetative inventory and management plan is also 
needed. 

Although water impoundments in the Curecanti project 
have altered fish propagation, a fish-management and 
stocking program administered by the Colorado Division 
of Wildlife in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service on Blue Mesa Lake has increased-- 
rather than diminished — the valuable fishing resource 
and contributed to the fishing activities throughout 
the region. Morrow Point Lake and Crystal Lake further 
enhance this fishing resource. Considering the sharp 
upward trend in recreational fishing, there is a need 
to supply an adequate harvest through an extensive 
fish-stocking program. At present, the Federal 
government is providing about 33 percent of the annual 
stocking program with the State of Colorado providing 
the other 67 percent. 

Currently, Kokanee salmon and five varieties of trout 
provide fishermen of the Gunnison River, the three 
lakes, and the many side streams with a high quality 
fishing experience. In spring and summer, for those 
with the technique, catches of large mackinaw trout 
have been made. The lakes of Curecanti have developed 
into a fine sport fishery with kokanee snagging season 
adding still another dimension from October to 
December. Ice fishing on Blue Mesa Lake in winter is 
particularly productive for rainbow trout. 

3 . Scenery and Natural Objects 

Curecanti lies in the heart of one of the most scenic 
areas of the Central Rockies--well known for its 
outdoor recreation opportunities. The scenery, water 
conditions, and resources vary considerably within the 
recreation area providing visitors with a wide range of 
recreational opportunities. 

In the vicinity of Blue Mesa Lake, shoreline slopes are 
grass and sagebrush covered gently reaching toward 
9,000-foot mesas with their sheltered stands of Douglas 
fir, spruce, and aspen. The mesas are incised by 
canyons and gulches characterized by cottonwood and 
willow riparian habitat. Beautiful displays of wild 
flowers are seen in the upland meadows of this high 



15 



mountain desert. Volcanic deposits laid down eons ago 
have since eroded on the mesa faces into spires and 
pinnacles as seen on Dillon Mesa. 

The towering walls of the Black Canyon of the Gunnison 
are an imposing feature of Morrow Point Lake and 
Crystal Lake creating still another experience for the 
park visitor. Dramatically sculptured from the canyon 
wall, Morrow Point Lake's Curecanti Needle stands as an 
excellent example of North American, precambrian 
bedrock. Chipeta Falls showers down on the upper end 
of Morrow Point Lake and illustrates the dynamics of 
canyon carving. Shrubs, intermingled with conifers, 
cover the north facing slopes and canyon rims along 
Morrow Point Lake and Crystal Lake. 

Roadways along canyon rims and mesas offer spectacular 
views for the surrounding canyons, eroded cliffs, 
forest-covered mountains, and rugged, snow-clad peaks. 

4 . Archeological Sites 

The Curecanti Archeological District, consisting of a 
complex of 79 prehistoric sites in the Blue Mesa 
District and encompassing 6,750.25 acres, was listed on 
the National Register of Historic Places as of 
August 15, 1984. Prehistoric sites dating as far back 
as 10,000 years ago represent a significant change in 
the understanding of man's use of Colorado's high 
mountain valleys to the extent that new chapters will 
have to be added to what is known about southwestern 
archeology. A considerable collection of artifacts 
(projectile points, manos, matates, knives, scrapers, 
bone, charcoal, and such) is in storage at the Midwest 
Archeological Center, Lincoln, Nebraska. There is a 
need to have a representative artifact study collection 
returned to the park to be used for illustrative as 
well as educative purposes at Curecanti. However, the 
facilities would not accommodate the return of the 
entire collection of artifacts. 

Of the 79 sites within the Curecanti Archeological 
District, 15 have been examined to date. Three ways 
the importance of these sites cannot be over-emphasized 
are (1) the antiquity of the sites--10000 B.C. to 
A.D. 1500; (2) the presence of habitation structures 
suggesting a somewhat greater degree of 
permanence--4500 B.C.; and (3) the variety of site 
types and implied functions represented. The 



16 



protection of surface artifacts is being accomplished 
through ranger patrols and interpretive programs. 

5 . Historic Objects 

The Cimarron area and Lake Fork of the Gunnison at 
Gateview are focal points for illustrating the role of 
the narrow gauge railroad in realizing the 
transcontinental dream and in the development of 
western Colorado. The Gateview historic sites typify 
1880 railroad construction camps and relate the 
influence of emigrants on the building of the railroad. 
On a larger scale, currently displayed at Cimarron are 
eight pieces of Denver and Rio Grande rolling stock 
(engine, tender, boxcar, caboose, sheep car, cattle 
car, outfit car, and crane car). This display shows 
the type of equipment used and its economic importance 
to the locale. Cimarron was used as a "helper station" 
to add engines for the 4-percent Cerro Summit grade to 
the West in 1882. Later, the station would become a 
major livestock shipping point in Colorado. A corral 
has been constructed at the site to illustrate this 
portion of Cimarron's history. Conquering of the Black 
Canyon of the Gunnison is documented with the 
preservation of the Cimarron River crossing trestle. 
Although it was originally wood construction, this 
circa 1892 metal structure was placed on the National 
Register of Historic Places on June 18, 1976. Truly, 
it represents a monument to the talents of the early 
mountain railroad builders. The entire display at 
Cimarron depicts the rise and fall of the narrow gauge 
as a mountain transportation system. 

In order to maintain the integrity of the trestle, a 
historic maintenance guide is needed. A historic 
furnishings study for the outfit car is also needed to 
identify period furnishings for acquisition. 

The Gunnison Diversion Tunnel and Dam at the East 
Portal area are initial points in man's development of 
water projects in the West. Constructed between 1904 
and 1912, this project provided irrigation waters for 
the thirsty lands of the Uncompahgre Valley. 
Considered a major engineering undertaking, it has been 
designated as a National Historic Civil Engineering 
Landmark by the American Society of Civil Engineers, 
1972, and has been listed on the National Register of 
Historic Places, July 1979. The facility has been an 
operating facility ever since its construction. This 
U.S. Bureau of Reclamation property is managed by the 
Uncompahgre Valley Water Users Association under a 
contract agreement dated December 13, 1948. 

17 



The West Elk Creek Cabins, site of an early to middle 
20th Century homestead and sawmill, was evaluated for 
possible inclusion on the National Register. The 
evaluation process indicated that the structures were 
not of historical significance. Actions have been 
taken to extend the life of the structures and protect 
and interpret the site, however, the structures will be 
allowed to molder. 

A professional study of the history of the Curecanti 
area is needed to identify other historical resources 
above high water as well as prepare a listing of 
locations, historic names, and descriptions of areas 
now inundated by the reservoir. No documents exist 
which detail the historic use and activity in the 
Gunnison River Valley now within Curecanti 's boundary, 
nor has there been information compiled on the 
evolution of Curecanti as managed by the National Park 
Service. This study requires funding in the near 
future since vital information is being lost as people 
and information pass out of existence. 

C. LAND USES AND TRENDS 

Park acreage including the surface area of Blue Mesa 
Lake, Morrow Point Lake, and Crystal Lake totals 42,114 
acres. Within this total are two inholdings of 40 and 
160 acres respectively. These inholdings are 
principally used for livestock grazing. A legislative 
package has been prepared for formal establishment of 
the boundaries of the recreation area for a total 
40,209.69 acres containing no inholdings. No legal 
survey of the Curecanti boundary has been conducted to 
date . 

The principal use of the land surrounding Curecanti 
National Recreation Area has traditionally been the 
grazing of domestic livestock. A few ranches are in 
operation near the recreation area boundaries. Most of 
the surrounding land is federally owned and grazing 
rights are authorized through lease arrangements with 
the Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management. 
The Bureau of Land Management continues to manage 
grazing allotments within the national recreation area 
as specified in the Memorandum of Agreement between the 
U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and the National Park 
Service. Information on grazing levels, range 
conditions, and needed range improvements, as well as 
existing and potential grazing-use conflicts with 
recreation and wildlife interests, has not been 



compiled for use by park staff. The traditional uses 
of some areas within the park for haying and pasturing 
have also been allowed to continue through the issuance 
of annual Special-Use Permits which will be reviewed 
for compliance and appropriateness. 

Livestock grazing and mining have been past uses within 
the recreation area but may be phased out where 
mandated by legislation or found to be in conflict with 
and detrimental to recreation use, wildlife management 
requirements, or other special uses such as on research 
sites. Existing mining claims and rights have not been 
identified nor surveyed for mineral ownership or 
interests . 

Several miles outside the recreation area boundary and 
upstream from Blue Mesa Reservoir are several mining 
operations which open and close depending on the 
marketplace. Many of them involve the extraction of 
heavy metals. The long-term effects of these 
operations on the water quality and therefore wildlife 
and recreational use at Curecanti has not been fully 
explored. 

A Special-Use Permit with the Colorado Department of 
Highways which allowed for the quarrying, crushing, and 
stockpiling of gravel on the Bay of Chickens Site was 
terminated in December of 1984 (1 year early) because 
of the conflict between that mining operation and the 
recreational use of the site. The Bay of Chickens Site 
has become a popular spot on the lake for sailboarding. 
The Bay of Chickens is now being considered for 
designation as a day-use area with limited development 
as part of a planning process which could result in an 
amendment to Curecanti' s General Management Plan. 

The only active mining operation currently within the 
national recreation area is the Dickerson Pit, a 
decomposed granite pit used to mine gravel; it is 
on the east end of the national recreation area. This 
has been authorized by the annual issuance of a 
Special-Use Permit since 1984. The pit is seasonally 
operated by Formaz and Son, Inc., who have a lease 
agreement with the owner of the mineral rights to 
operate the pit through 1988 with an additional 5-year 
option. Their Plan of Operation calls for mining 
activity to continue into the mid-1990' s. 



19 



The Gunnison River valley is surrounded by mountainous 
forest country. On the north and east are the Gunnison 
and San Isabel National Forests; to the southeast, the 
Saguache Range; and to the south and southwest, the 
rugged San Juan Mountains. To the west, adjacent to 
the recreation area boundary, is the Black Canyon of 
the Gunnison National Monument, a precipitous gorge 
through which the Gunnison River flows. Curecanti lies 
in the heart of this; one of the most scenic areas of 
the Central Rockies, well known for its outdoor 
recreation opportunities including lake and stream 
fishing, hunting, camping, and outstanding wilderness 
areas to explore. 

With kokanee salmon and five varieties of trout, 
Curecanti has the potential of providing fishermen with 
fishing experiences of the highest quality. The 
free-flowing portion of the Gunnison River upstream 
from the national recreation area is nationally known 
for its trout fishing. Quality deer and elk hunting 
exist within and adjacent to the area. 

A selection of campsites , for both tent campers and 
recreational vehicle units, can be found throughout the 
surrounding national forests and on private and public 
lands as well as within the recreation area. Towns 
near the recreation area have a variety of motels in 
numbers adequate for the present volume of visitation. 
Commercial camping facilities have increased near 
Gunnison and the owners have expressed a willingness to 
accommodate the additional camping needs of the 
visiting public. 

With the cyclic closures of mines in the area, the 
economy of the local communities have become more 
dependent upon recreation and tourism. Gunnison County 
has started a winter marketing effort spearheaded by 
the Crested Butte Mountain Resort. For the 1985-86 
winter season, American Airlines made direct flights 
into Gunnison from Dallas, Houston, Chicago, and Los 
Angeles. Plans are being considered to lengthen the 
Gunnison runway to accommodate larger aircraft for next 
season. This winter visitation to the area may 
eventually have some spinoff on the summer tourist 
trade . 

Developers catering to the recreating public have 
started to build on lands adjoining Curecanti' s 
boundary. Blue Mesa Recreational Ranch is on 77 acres 
north of the boundary at Willow Creek on the Iola basin 



20 



portion of Blue Mesa Lake. Construction of the 16 
cabins, 293 RV sites, "club house," and utility and 
support facilities which are planned is well under way. 

Construction of the first phase of Blue Mesa Highlands 
RV Resort is scheduled to start this year (1986). 
Plans call for the eventual construction of 2,500 RV 
sites to be serviced by a small group of businesses and 
appropriate utility systems. This development, located 
on 900 acres in the Sapinero area, is nearly surrounded 
by the lands of Curecanti National Recreation Area on 
the south side of Blue Mesa Lake. 

Subdivisions of land for cabin and home sites on lands 
adjacent to the recreation area are not new to 
Curecanti. They started with the relocation of some of 
the residents of townsites which were flooded by the 
reservoir. The most recent subdivision is known as 
Iola Highlands West, a subdivision of 24 acres into 
eight lots immediately south of the national recreation 
area boundary and a few hundred feet upstream from the 
well which services the Iola Day-Use Area. 

To date, there have been few actions taken to ascertain 
how the change in the use of the lands adjacent to the 
national recreation area boundary may affect the 
natural resources , the recreational experience of 
visitors, or the ability of existing facilities at 
Curecanti to accommodate the changes. 

There is a need for a legal survey of the actual 
boundary at Curecanti in areas adjacent to private 
lands. With the development taking place on adjacent 
lands, there is a high potential for encroachment. 
Several conflicts with adjacent landowners have 
occurred recently. Conflict resolution and an 
increased level of resource protection would result 
with the completion of accurate legal boundary survey 
adjoining private lands. A survey of the remaining 
portion of Curecanti' s boundary can be postponed until 
legislation has passed. 

Ice jamming on the Gunnison River has resulted in 
reoccurring flooding to private lands upstream of Blue 
Mesa Reservoir during severe winter and spring months. 
The Bureau of Reclamation will likely propose ways of 
mitigating the problem. As proposals are forthcoming 
from the Bureau, the staff at Curecanti will be 
evaluating and making input regarding the impacts which 
those efforts may have on the operation or resources of 
the recreation area. 



21 



D. VISITOR USE ANALYSIS 

Visitation totaled over 1,071,000 in 1985 representing 
a fairly steady increase from the 729,000 visits 
recorded in 1978. The peak-use season consists of the 
four summer months --June through September. Peak 
visitation occurs during the Memorial Day, July 4th, 
and Labor Day weekends when between 22,000 and 30,000 
visits per weekend are recorded. 

Family groups make up about 82 percent of the visits to 
Curecanti. Nearly half of the visitors are senior 
citizens (48 percent is greater than 62 years old, 25 
percent is 18-61 years old, 12 percent is 13-17 years 
old, and 15 percent is less than 12 years old). 
Visitor use of Curecanti is varied with the primary 
uses being water-oriented. Sportsmen account for a 
significant percentage of the visits recorded each 
year . 

The graphics on the following pages provide additional 
information regarding Curecanti' s visitation. 

Boating with its many variations such as fishing, water 
skiing, sailing, sailboarding , and sightseeing is the 
most popular use. Other uses include picnicking, 
camping, and hiking. The primary winter activity is 
ice fishing with an average of over 50 fishermen per 
day on the ice. Snowmobiling and cross-country skiing 
are also popular activities. Hunting is a limited 
activity within the recreation area, but the 
surrounding public lands contain productive hunting 
areas for elk and deer. 

Point of origin surveys conducted at Curecanti National 
Recreation Area indicate that just over half (54 
percent) of all visitors are regional residents and one 
quarter (25 percent) of all visitors are from out of 
state. Twenty percent of the visitors are from the 
local area while about one percent are visitors from 
other countries. The survey conducted also indicated 
that the average length of stay in Curecanti 's 
campgrounds was 3 days with 45 percent of all visitors 
spending two or more nights. Repeat visitors, however, 
stayed upward of 7 days. This latter figure may be 
attributed to fishing success by returning visitors. 

Within a 300-mile radius of Curecanti National 
Recreation Area are three zones of concentrated 
population totalling in excess of 3,600,000 in 1980. 



22 



T3 

C 

is 
en 

3 
O 



220 














CM CM 










m 








vO 






120 




5 














M 








m 








" 




w 










in 




r» 






CM 














in 






M3 
CM 




m" 










p4 








70 


M 


































vO 














M 














<T 














o 














r^ 


50 














































« 












O 




t^ 
















<» 












CM 




<J 
















f" CM 

in °. 














On 




N CM CM 
















CM 


20 


N O CM 
























































































mm l 











Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 



Monthly Visitation - 1985 



100 



1 million 



ID 

-o 

c 

IS 

Ifl 

3 



JZ 



900 



800 



700 



77 78 



T T 

79 80 



— T— 
81 82 83 84 



Annual Visitation 

Curecanti National Recreation Area 

23 



u 

re 


a 

US 

m 


CO 

c 

O 

B 
U 

'S. 

Q 


w 
c 

a 
E 
« 

o 


water 
skiing 


CO 

c 

m 

m 



Q 


CO 

c 

(A 

s 


0* 

c 

MM* 

c 

p 

Q 


ha 

jC 


Q 


CO 

e 

!.§ 

9 


total 
(thousands) 


1967 




















182 


1968 




















303 


1969 


166 


9 


113 


1 


52 


97 


1 





_ 


441 


1970 


260 


9 


111 


1 


56 


122 


1 





— 


562 


1971 


484 


5 


95 


1 


53 


109 


1 


1 


— 


750 


1972 


459 


13 


98 


2 


56 


102 


1 





— 


732 


1973 


477 


13 


97 


1 


42 


84 


1 





_ 


716 


1974 


460 


7 


114 


1 


43 


84 








_ 


710 


1975 


609 


10 


109 


2 


46 


74 








-. 


852 


1976 


481 


14 


102 


3 


52 


82 








*:— 


736 


1977 


541 


30 


86 


5 


89 


111 








— 


866 


1978 


340 


53 


109 


8 


88 


125 


1 





*» : 


729 


1979 


387 


56 


98 


8 


103 


154 








— 


809 


1980 


420 


74 


99 


8 


107 


179 


1 





_<_ 


891 


1981 


459 


87 


102 


7 


126 


203 


2 





—. 


990 


1982 


476 


80 


94 


6 


134 


195 


2 





7 


994 


1983 


601 


68 


105 


2 


129 


140 


1 


2 


2 


1,050 


1984 


667 


49 


99 


2 


70 


101 


1 


2 


3 


994 


1985 


693 


69 


117 


1 


68 


116 


1 


2 


5 


1,072 



Annual Visitation by Activity 

Curecanti National Recreation Area 



24 



While the population of Colorado has stabilized over 
the past couple of years, the State's population 
increased by one-third from 1970 to 1980. As the 
visibility of the recreational opportunities available 
in the Gunnison area increases, visitation to Curecanti 
can be expected to increase. 

E. FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT 

The construction of initial facilities within Curecanti 
National Recreation Area is virtually complete. A 
5-year accelerated development program to complete 
initial facilities at Curecanti began in fiscal year 
1980 under Section 8 funding of the CRSP Act and was 
nearly completed by the end of fiscal year 1984. Loose 
ends of the program are scheduled to be finished up 
during 1986 and early 1987. 

While the construction aspect of Curecanti as a 
"developing" area is nearly complete, the operational 
aspect is not. Curecanti has never had an Operations 
of National Park Service budget which is adequate to 
operate and maintain the facilities which have been 
constructed in the past few years. Between that and 
the possible effects of Gramm-Rudman-Hollings , the 
staff as Curecanti is greatly concerned that a limited 
operating budget will result in the deterioration of 
newly constructed facilities. 

A comparison of National Park Service facilities and 
equipment at Curecanti for 1979 and 1985 follows: 



1. Roads and Trails: 

a. Lane miles of road 

b. Trails 

(1) number 

(2) miles 

2. Buildings and Grounds: 



Buildings 

(1) Number 

(2) Square feet 38 
Buildings include 

(1) Administration building 

(2) Visitor center 

(3) Visitor information/ 
contact stations 

(4) Maintenance shops/ 
storage buildings 

(5) Quarters units 

(a) For number of 
employees 



1979 

42.7 

2 
1.7 



63 

150 



11 
12 



1985 

79.0 

10 
17.0 



108 
80,920 



12 

23 
50 



25 



1979 1985 

(6) Comfort stations 13 51 

(a) Water-borne 10 9 

(b) Vaults 3 30 

(c) Combination 6 

(d) Backcountry bucket 6 

c. Fee campgrounds 1 8 

Campsites 157 396 

d. Non-fee campgrounds 1 8 

e. Amphitheaters 1 4 

Utility Systems: 

a. Water systems 4 5 

b. Hand pumps 12 

c. Wastewater treatment systems 3 6 

d. Irrigation systems 3 10 

e. Solid waste collection 

points 100 200 

f. Fuel sites 8 13 

(1) Gasoline 3 5 

(2) Diesel 3 5 

(3) Propane 2 3 

Major Equipment: 

a. Heavy Equipment 5 14 

b. GSA Rental Vehicles 23 24 

c. Light equipment 20 25 

d. Patrol and maintenance boats 9 13 

e. Tour boats 1 2 

f. Marine engines 8 23 

g. Public courtesy docks 3 5 
h. Concrete boat launching ramps 2 6 
i. Harbor breakwater systems 1 3 
j . Dry dock 1 

Wayside Exhibits/Museum Objects: 

a. Bulletin boards (with area 15 
orientation maps and site 

specific maps) 

b. Area orientation maps in 10 
oblique enclosures 

c. Interpretive panels covering 3 41 
natural and human historical 

subjects 

d. Narrow-gauge railroad engines 5 8 
and cars 

e. Accessioned museum groups 66 
representing natural history, 

history, and prehistory 

f. Traveler information stations 2 



26 



F. STATUS OF PLANNING 

Date 
Name of Plan/Study Preparer Approved Adequate Repository 

GENERAL MANAGEMENT 
PLANS 



General Management 
Plan 

Amendment 1 
Amendment 2 
Amendment 3 



Dunkley 



7/2/70 
9/1/82 
7/22/83 
Pending 



No 



RMR/CURE 
RMR/CURE 
RMR/CURE 
CURE/RMR 



Curecanti's General Management Plan as currently written was 
designed as a guide for the Section 8 construction program. 
At this time, the General Management Plan is dated and needs 
to be revised, but the revision may be postponed until the 
legislative process to formally establish Curecanti is 
complete. During the legislative process, it is expected 
that Congressional committees may take a hand in planning 
for the national recreation area. Currently, proposed 
legislation calls for a 3-year planning process to develop a 
General Management Plan for the entire park and recreation 
area complex. 



Natural Resources Andrascik 3/23/84 
Management Plan 

Cultural Resource Jones 3/28/84 
Management Plan 



Yes 



Yes 



Legislative 
Package 

ACTION PLANS 

Natural Resources 

Fire Management 
Plan 

100-Year Flood- 
plain Analysis 

Cultural Resources 



O'Shea 1/30/86 Yes 
approval pending 



CURE Staff 
U.S.B.R. 



7/85 
1980 



Yes 



Yes 



CURE/RMR 
CURE/RMR 
RMR/ CURE 



CURE 



CURE/DSC 
U.S.B.R. 



Historic Maintenance Jones 

Guide (Cimarron 

Exhibit) 



1977 



Yes 



CURE 



27 



Date 
Name of Plan/ Study Preparer Approved Adequate Repository 



Visitor Services 

Interpretive Plan Reed 

Annual Statement Hill 
for Interpretation 

Concessions Manage- 
ment Plan 

Loss Control 
Management Plan 

Dam Emergency Plan Blank 

Maintenance and Support 



4/1/80 



No 



1985 Yes 
Currently being updated 

Currently in process 

Currently in process 

11/26/85 Yes 



Quarters Management Heywood 2/7/86 Yes 
Plan Approval pending 



CURE/RMR 
CURE/RMR 



CURE/RMR 



CURE/RMR 



G. 



EXISTING MANAGEMENT ZONING 



Land and water at Curecanti National R.ecreation Area 
are zoned as to what type of use is allowed in each 
area. The zoning is based on that area's inherent 
physical character and its potential for accommodating 
use. The system used for Curecanti National Recreation 
Area, separates the area into four broad categories as 
follows : 

1 . Park Development Zones 

These are areas which have high potential to 
accommodate recreation use without severe adverse 
effects on the natural environment. Areas in this 
category may include boat launching areas, campgrounds, 
picnic areas, and interpretive, administrative, and 
maintenance facilities. 



2. 



Natural Zones 



Included in this category are areas having outstanding 
or sensitive natural qualities. They may be features 
or entire ecosystem areas which should be preserved to 



28 




ffiff" TO GUNNISON 



Curecant 
sU NeedU 



17 







recreation area boundary 



development zone 



natural zone 



historic & archeological zone 



special use zone -Water & 
Power Resources Service 



special use zone - reservoir 



EXISTING MANAGEMENT ZONING 
CURECANTI NATIONAL RECREATION AREA 

MONTROSE AND GUNNISON COUNTIES 

COLORADO 

NEW MEXICO PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

616 I 80.037 A 



AUG 86 I RMRO 



Gunnison River Diversion Dam & 
Tunnel - National Register Site 







Denver & Rio Grande Narrow Guage 
trestle - National Register Site 



recreation area boundary 

development zone 

]] natural zo 

~2 historic & archeological zone 

p-iij special use zone -Water & 
' ^ '*■ > Power Resources Service 

al use zone - reservoir 



EXISTING MANAGEMENT ZONING 
CURECANTI NATIONAL RECREATION AREA 

MONTROSE AND GUNNISON COUNTIES 
COLORADO 

NEW MEXICO PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN 



AUG 86 I RMRO 



enhance the integrity of the total park environment. 
Only minor physical development such as foot trails and 
interpretive exhibits are permitted in this category. 

3 . Historic and Archeological Zones 

Included in this zone are areas of historic or 

archeological significance to be protected or 

interpreted as well as structures and sites which are 
on the National Register of Historic Places. 

4 . Special Use Zones 

This category includes land areas controlled by Bureau 
of Reclamation for operation of the Wayne N. Aspinall 
Unit for its primary purposes. It includes the access 
roads to the three dam sites, power generation and 
distribution facilities, and related facilities. Lake 
surface areas and areas below the maximum pool 
elevation of the lakes are zoned in the reservoir 
special-use zone. 

The location of land and water areas included in each 
zone is shown on the Existing Management Zoning Map. 

IV. MAJOR ISSUES 

A. PARK GENERAL 

1 . Curecdnti's "Developing" Area Status 

Curecanti, classified as a "developing" area, has 
completed the 5-year, Section 8 facility construction 
program but has not yet received the Operations of 
National Park Service budget needed to operate and 
properly maintain the facilities constructed. 

2 . Effects of Gramm-Rudmann-Hollings 

Reducing an already inadequate budget may necessitate 
limited operations and inadequate maintenance 
procedures leading to the deterioration of newly 
constructed facilities. 

3 . Proposed Legislation 

The status and configuration of legislation proposed 
for the formal establishment of Curecanti National 
Recreation Area is of utmost concern to the park staff. 



31 



4 . Legal Survey of Boundary 

An accurate legal survey and monumenting of Curecanti's 
boundary adjacent to private lands is needed to resolve 
law enforcement, resource, and possible encroachment 
issues. Piecemeal preliminary surveys previously done 
have proven inaccurate and have resulted in conflicts 
with adjacent landowners. 

A comprehensive legal survey and monumenting of the 
remaining portion of Curecanti's boundary will be 
needed once the location of the boundary has been 
legislatively determined. 

5 . Complete History of the Curecanti Area 

There is no complete history compiled for the lands now 
called Curecanti National Recreation Area nor of the 
National Park Service administration of those lands. 
Knowledgeable people with valuable information are 
passing out of existence. Action is required in the 
near future if much valuable information is to be 
saved. 

6 . Neighboring Land Development and Use 

Several subdivisions and recreation vehicle parks are 
under construction on lands adjacent to the Curecanti 
boundary. The impacts of those increased levels of 
development on the recreational experience or the 
natural resources of the park have not been looked at. 
The potential for additional development adjacent to 
Curecanti is great. 

7 . Visitation Growth 

Visitation at Curecanti has increased at a fairly 
steady rate over the past 7 years. The ability of 
existing or reduced levels of personnel to provide 
quality services into the future, if the growth pattern 
continues, will at best provide a considerable 
challenge to the park staff. 

8 . Decision on National Park Service Authority 
Concerning Rights-of -Way 

Requests from the Colorado Department of Highways to 
widen some sections of the right-of-way of U.S. Highway 
50 which runs across the lands administered by the 
National Park Service at Curecanti were forwarded to 



32 



the Bureau of Reclamation after review by the Regional 
Solicitor. The National Park Service is issuing a 
right-of-way to a private landowner from U.S. Highway 
50, across the highway right-of-way and a short piece 
(103 feet) of the national recreation area to provide 
access to privately owned lands. Access to 
neighboring lands is an issue. What authority in what 
situations does the park have to issue right-of-ways 
for roads/highways? 

9 . Authorized Uses of Curecanti Lands 

No comprehensive list of rights-of-way, licensing 
agreements, special-use permits, or other authorizing 
documents issued by the Bureau of Reclamation, the 
Bureau of Land Management, or the U.S. Forest Service 
for the use of lands now administered by the National 
Park Service has been compiled. 

10 . Ice Jamming on the Gunnison River 

As the Bureau of Reclamation identifies alternatives 
for mitigating the ice jamming and resultant flooding 
of the Gunnison River upstream from Curecanti, the park 
staff will evaluate the impacts the alternatives may 
have on the operation and resources of the recreation 
area and make appropriate input to the Bureau. 

B. NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 

1 . Data on Water Quality, Needs, and Rights 

Baseline water quality data and an ongoing monitoring 
program are needed to allow detection and response to 
resource degradation. 

A determination of the minimum water necessary to 
preserve the integrity of the physical resources as 
well as the visitor experience is needed. 

Research to determine the legal water rights of 
Curecanti is needed. 

A comprehensive Water Resources Management Plan is 
needed. 

2 . Prairie Dog Management 

The susceptibility of the Gunnison Prairie Dog to 
bubonic plague and their close proximity to campgrounds 



33 



at Curecanti result in a need to monitor and control 
populations adjacent to developed areas in the park. 

3 . Baseline Data on Flora 

No parkwide vegetative inventory exists. Once the base 
data is gathered, a vegetative management plan will be 
developed to address issues including grazing 
management within the national recreation area. 

4 . Baseline Data on Fauna 

Existing data on most species at Curecanti was gathered 
prior to the construction of the reservoirs. No data 
has been gathered since. An inventory of small 
vertebrates is needed to allow us to take proactive 
management actions. Big game species have received 
more attention to date because of the role of the 
Colorado Division of Wildlife. 

5 . Existing Mining Claims 

Existing mining claims or mineral ownership or 
interests have not been identified within the Curecanti 
boundary. 

C. CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 

1 . Cultural and Historical Resource Protection 

Continual monitoring and protection of all identified 
cultural and historical resources including those in 
the Curecanti National Archeological District is needed 
on an ongoing basis. 

2 . Historic Maintenance Guide - Cimarron Trestle 

No maintenance guide has been done for the Denver and 
Rio Grande Western narrow gauge trestle at Cimarron. 
The structure which is on the National Register is 
currently being maintained without a comprehensive 
guide . 

3 . Historic Furnishings Study - Outfit Car (No. 04414) 

This car is one of the narrow gauge cars in the exhibit 
at Cimarron. Period furnishings which would have been 
used by the workmen of the time dating to the early 
1940' s need to be identified and acquired. 



34 



D. VISITOR SERVICES 

1 . Representative Collection of Artifacts for Park 
Use 

The Midwest Archeological Center has amassed a 
considerable collection of artifacts from the 
excavation of some sites within the Curecanti National 
Archeological District. There is a need to have a 
representative artifact study collection returned to 
the park to be used for illustrative as well as 
educative purposes. 

2 . Appropriate Concession Operations 

Planning for the upcoming concessions contract has 
started including an assessment of necessary and 
appropriate services and facilities to be included. 

E. MAINTENANCE OPERATIONS 

Maintenance Management System 

Some real benefits which could be derived from 
implementing such a system on the Datapoint computer 
system now being utilized at Curecanti can be seen. 
Curecanti awaits direction from the Region and the 
Washington Office before initiating the program. 
Additional funding to hire personnel necessary to 
implement the program will also be needed. 

V. MANAGEMENT OBJECTIVES 

A. Natural and cultural resources are conserved and 
protected for future generations to enjoy. 

B. Facilities are planned, designed, and constructed 
to provide necessary support for the outdoor recreation 
experiences at Curecanti National Recreation Area. 

C. Public orientation, information, and education 
services (media and personal services) are provided to 
expand and enhance understanding, appreciation, wise 
use, and protection of park resources by the visiting 
public . 

D. Management of financial and support resources is 
such that waste, mismanagement, and inefficiencies are 
eliminated. 



35 



E. Facilities are operated and maintained to assure 
the life, health, safety, and enjoyment of visitors to 
Curecanti National Recreation Area. 

F. Public relations maintain a favorable image for 
outdoor recreation experiences at Curecanti National 
Recreation Area and for the National Park Service in 
general . 

G. Administrative support services are provided which 
enable the accomplishment of Curecanti 2 s mission, 
goals, and objectives. 

H. Visitor support services and experiences are 
provided by private industry (concessionaire and other) 
for park visitors in support of the outdoor recreation 
experience at Curecanti National Recreation Area. 

1. Visitor protection services are provided for all 
Curecanti National Recreation Area visitors and 
emergency services are performed at the highest 
National Park Service standards. 



36 



APPENDIX 

Supporting information related to the management of 
Curecanti National Recreation Area is included in this 
Appendix as follows: 

A. Section 8 of the Colorado River Storage Project 
Act of April 11, 1956 (70 Stat. 105). 

B. Secretary of the Interior memorandum dated 
February 17, 1958; Subject: Designation of 
Responsibility for carrying out the provisions of 
Section 8, Public Law 485, Colorado River Storage 
Project and Participating Projects. 

C. Memorandum of Agreement between the Bureau of 
Reclamation and the National Park Service relating to 
the Development and Administration of Recreation on the 
Curecanti Unit, Colorado River Storage Project, dated 
February 11, 1965. 

D. Memorandum of Understanding between the Forest 
Service (Department of Agriculture) and the National 
Park Service (Department of the Interior) dated 
July 11, 1966. 



37 



PUBLIC LAW 8A-A85--April 11, 1956 



tiVh'm'a^ifJui ^ zc - 8 - J " connect ion with the development of the Colorado River 
rnciuuam. storage project and of (lie pajinipatinp projects, the Secretary is 

authorized and iliicctpil to investigate, plan. construct, operate, and 
maintain (1) public recreational facilities on hinds withdrawn or 
acquired for the development of said project or of said pai 1 icipaling 
projects, to conserve the scenery, ihe natural, historic, and .arch colonic 
objects., arid the wildlife on said land c , and to provide for public use 
arid enjoyment of the same snd of the water an-.ts ui.-.wd by these 
projects by such means as are consistent nith the primary purposes of 
said projects; and (2) facilities to mitigate Iossps of. and improve 
conditions for, the propagation of n c h and wildlife. The Secretary 
is authorized to a< rjnire lands ^ i nd to m ithdrnw public lande from e n < ry 
or other dicpor ii ion undor the public hmd h i v. o neccs.sary for tlie con- 
struction, opei'.ation, and maintenance of the facilities herein provided, 
and to dispose of them to Federal, .State, and local ;jo\ ernmcntal 
fluencies by lease, transfer, e:\ehanpe. or conveyance upon such terms 
and conditions as will best promote their development and opeiation 
in the public interest. All costs incurred pursuant to this section 
shall be nonreimbursable arid nom etumable. 



*This provision was repealed by the Federal Land Policy and 
Management Act, Public Law 9A-579, October 21, 1976. 
(90 Stat. 2792) 



38 



February 17, 1958 



Memorandum 

To: Secretary of the Interior 

From: Director, National Park Service 

Subject: Designation of Responsibility for Carrying Out 
the Provisions of Section 8, Public Law 485, 
Colorado River Storage Project and Participating 
Projects 

Planning and construction of recreation facilities on 
reservoirs authorized by the Colorado River Storage Project Act 
are definite responsibilities of the Department under provisions 
of Section 8 of that Act, copy attached. This Section also pro- 
vides for the acquisition of lands necessary for recreation 
facilities . 

The National Park Service has been cooperating with 
the Bureau of Reclamation in developing preliminary recreation 
plans for first priority reservoirs in the Upper Colorado and 
has obtained funds for this purpose. There is urgent need now, 
however, for approximately $23,000 with which to investigate and 
adjudicate certain mining claims and to acquire a few partial 
tracts for recreation purposes, adjacent to lands being acquired 
by the Bureau for reservoir project purposes, so that severance 
damages may be avoided. 

The Bureau can accomplish this work most expeditiously 
and economically if it does so at the same time it is acquiring 
land for reservoir operation and maintenance purposes. However, 
Section 5 of the Colorado River Storage Project Act provides that 
the Bureau shall derive its funds from the Upper Colorado River 
Basin Fund, thereby precluding it from carrying out the provisions 
of Section 8. This latter Section provides that all costs incurred 
pursuant to recreation and fish, and wildlife expenditures shall be 
nonreimbursable and nonreturnable. 

It is the joint recommendation of the Bureau and the 
Service that you designate the National Park Service as the agency 



39 



responsible for carrying out the Department's obligation under 
Section 8 of the above act except, of course, as it relates to 
provision number (2) concerning fish and wildlife. Under this 
procedure, the Service could transfer funds to the Bureau for 
urgent comment needs and request funds with which to reimburse 
the Bureau for future years requirements. There will be many other 
recreation problems, of course, that will arise as the Colorado 
River Storage Project progresses. However, we feel that these can 
be met as they occur within the framework of Departmental policy 
and budgetary procedures. 

There is a meeting pending between representative of 
this Department and the Department of Agriculture to discuss broad 
principles relating to the planning and development of recreation 
facilities on reclamation withdrawn lands within national forests. 
Certain national forests within the Upper Colorado River Basin 
will be partially affected by Bureau of Reclamation reservoirs. 
Your designation of the National Park Service as the agency re- 
sponsible for carrying out the provisions of Section 8 of the 
Colorado River Storage Project Act will not, however, predetermine 
the position to be taken in these pending discussions. We expect 
to submit our recommendation in the near future concerning these 
basic policy questions for consideration and negotiation at 
Departmental level. 

A Memorandum of Agreement will be developed by the Bureau 
and the Service for each reservoir area to provide a long-term basis 
for administration and development of the recreation resources. 
We hope you will see fit to approve this interim designation of 
responsibility requested herein at an early date in order that the 
Service may include the necessary funds in its 1960 fiscal year 
estimates . 



/S/ Conrad L. Wirth 
Director 

Attachment 

I concur: Mar 12, 1958 

/S/ Alfred R. Golze 
Commissioner of Reclamation 

Approved: April 21, 1958 

/S/ Fred A. Seaton 
Secretary of the Interior 



40 



MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT 

Between 

THE BUREAU OF RECLAMATION 

and 
THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
RELATING TO THE DEVELOPMENT AND ADMINISTRATION OF 
RECREATION ON THE CURECANTI UNIT 
COLORADO RIVER STORAGE PROJECT 

THIS MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT, made and entered into this 11th 
day of February 1965, between the BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, hereinafter 
referred to as the Bureau, and the NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, hereinafter 
referred to as the Service as agencies of the United States of America: 

WITNESSETH THAT: 

WHEREAS the Bureau is proceeding with the construction of the 
Curecanti Unit as a part of the Colorado River Storage Project authorized 
by the Act of April 11, 1956 (70 Stat. 105); and 

WHEREAS the Service has been designated as the agency responsible 
for carrying out the provision of Section 8 of the said Act of April 11, 
1956; and 

WHEREAS lands are being acquired and public lands have been withdrawn 
for the purposes of the project, as authorized by the aforesaid Act of 
April 11 , 1956; and 

WHEREAS a large number of persons are expected to use the lands 
and waters of such withdrawn area for the purposes of recreation; and 

WHEREAS the Act of August 7, 1946 (60 Stat. 885) authorizes the use 
of appropriated funds by the Service for the administration, protection, 
improvement, and maintenance of areas under the jurisdiction of other 
agencies of the Government when such areas are devoted to recreational 
use pursuant to cooperative agreements; and 

WHEREAS the Service is experienced in administering areas devoted 
to recreational use: 

NOW, THEREFORE, the Bureau and the Service do hereby mutually 
agree as follows: 

ARTICLE I 
GENERAL PROVISIONS 

1. The Bureau shall retain complete autnority over and responsibility 
for construction, operation and maintenance of the Blue Mesa, Morrow 
Point, and Crystal Dams and Reservoirs for primary project purposes 
together with all engineering works in connection therewith. Except 
for the areas required by the Bureau for construction, operation and 
maintenance of the dams, the Service shall administer all lands and 
waters within the project area, providing for recreation therein. 
The agreed areas of authority between the Bureau and the Service include 
all those lands acquired, withdrawn, or segregated by the Bureau for 
project purposes under the authority of the aforesaid Act of April 11, 
1956. These lands are generally depicted on the enclosed drawing marked 
Exhibit "A" and numbered SA-CUR-7101. This Exhibit may be revised at 
any time to illustrate changes in the project area as a result of land 
acquisition, or additional withdrawls. 



41 



2. The parties to this agreement acknowledge that, as authorized by 
Congress, each has an interest in the storage, release, and utilization 
of the water which is to be impounded by the Curecanti Unit, and that 
such unit was authorized, and is being constructed, for the primary 
purposes of irrigation, flood control, and the generation of hydro- 
electric power and the incidential purposes of recreation, and fish and 
wildlife conservation. This agreement shall not be construed to conflict 
with the primary purposes of the project or to alter the Bureau's control 
over storage and release of water. However, to the extent consistent 
with the authorized primary purposes of said project, the Bureau shall 
operate the dams and reservoirs in keeping with the Secretarial policy 
which provides for full consideration of public recreation and fish and 
wildlife conservation on reservoir projects undertaken by the Federal 
Government. The Service shall determine the optimum and minimum pool 
levels desirable for public recreational use and provide the Bureau with 
this information for consideration in carrying out the purposes of this 
paragraph. 

3. Prior to making any new development or granting any concession, 
lease, license or permit which, because of its nature or location will 
affect the Bureau's activities at the Curecanti Unit Dams, the Service 
shall ob-tain the concurrence of the Bureau. Before making any new 
development or granting any concession, lease, license, or permit at 
the Curecanti Unit Dams which will affect the recreational and tourist 
facilities on the remainder of the project area, the Bureau shall obtain 
the concurrence of the Service. If either party does not concur in 
such proposed development, concession, lease, license, or permit the 
proposal shall be held in abeyance until agreement is reached by the 
Bureau and the Service or the Secretary has resolved any differences 

of opinion. 

4. The parties to this agreement acknowledge and understand that the 
fulfillment of the agreement is contingent upon the availability of 
funds for the purposes thereof. 

ARTICLE II 
FUNCTIONS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

Subject to the primary purposes of the project, area limitations, and 
other provisions contained in Article I hereof, the Service in its 
administration of the project area for recreation, shall be responsible 
for: 

1. Preparing plans for and constructing recreational facilities, 
including roads and trails. 

2. Advertising for, evaluating and approving or rejecting bids and 
negotiating contracts for the installation or construction of recrea- 
tional facilities. 

3. Negotiating and executing contracts, with private individuals, 
partnerships or corporations for supplying necessary visitor services 



42 



related to recreational use of the project area, including, but not 
limited to, use of the waters for boating, canoeing, bathing, and 
sightseeing; and prescribing and enforcing reasonable rates and standards 
for the supplying of such services. 

4. Establishing and enforcing policies regarding the recreational use 
of lands and waters in the project area. It is understood that grazing 
activities within that portion of the project area administered by the 
Service shall be controlled and supervised by the Service in consultation 
with the Bureau of Land Management. 

5. Promulgating and enforcing such rules and regulations as are 
necessary or desirable for the conservation of any historic or arch- 
eological remains, and control of all archeological excavation and 
historical or archeological research or as may be needed for recreational 
use and enjoyment of the area and for the safety of visitors. 

6. Establishing and maintaining protective, interpretive, and other 
facilities and services as may be necessary for the safe and full use 
and enjoyment of the area for recreational purposes. Public information 
activities and services shall be provided by the Service through 
coordination with other Interior agencies in order to facilitate public 
understanding of the interrelated programs of these agencies within the 
area. 

7. Control of transportation in the area under its jurisdiction, whether 
by land, water, or air, to the extent consistent with Federal law, but 
such control shall not affect transportation the Bureau may require for 
the performance of its functions or transportation governed by Article III, 
paragraphs numbered 3 and 4. 

8. Extending to the Bureau and other agencies involved technical 
assistance in the planning and development of exhibits and interpretive 
devices oriented toward visitor understanding and enjoyment of the project 
and related resources. 

9. Negotiation of agreements or coordination of activities with State 
and Federal wildlife agencies as desirable for the conservation, pro- 
tection and interpretation of wildlife consistent with applicable law. 

10. Such other functions as are reasonably related to, or necessary for, 
its administration of the project area. 

ARTICLE III 
FUNCTIONS OF THE BUREAU OF RECLAMATION 

Subject to the area limitations and provisions contained in Article I 
hereof, the Bureau shall be responsible for: 

1. Construction, operation and maintenance of the Blue Mesa, Morrow 
Point and Crystal Dams and Reservoirs and all engineering works incidental 
thereto or in connection therewith, together with all appurtenances thereof 
for the proper storage, release, protection and utilization of water 

A3 



under the Federal Reclamation Laws. 

2. Consultation with the Service on matters involving the development or 
administration of recreational facilities or public information services 
to be provided in the areas required by the Bureau for construction, 
operation and maintenance of the three dams in the Curecanti Unit. 

3. Establishment and enforcement of rules and regulations governing 
public access to the Curecanti Unit Dams and the engineering works 
appurtenant thereto, and the control of traffic on the roads providing 
immediate access to the dams and their appurtenant engineering works. 

4. Establishment of and, in cooperation with the Service, enforcement 
of such limitations governing approach to the dams by water as may be 
necessary either for their efficient functioning or for the safety of 
the public. 

5. Coordination and preparation of reservoir management plans in 
cooperation with the Service and other concerned Federal, State, and local 
agencies, for management of the three dams and reservoirs in the project 
area. 

6. Consultation with the Service so that recreational development and 
administration of the project area will be coordinated with construction 
and operation of the Curecanti Unit. 

ARTICLE IV 
TERMINATION 

This memorandum shall remain in force unless the parties thereto mutually 
agree to its termination or termination is directed by the Secretary of 
the Interior, or until enactment by the Congress of inconsistent or 
superseding legislation. 



BUREAU OF RECLAMATION 

Date 1/8/1965 

(Sgd) Floyd E. Dominy 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
Date Dec. 21-1964 
(Sgd) George B. Hartzog 



Approved: February 11, 1965 

(Sgd) Stewart L. Udall 
Secretary of the Interior 



44 




MEMORANDUM OP UNDERSTANDING 
BETWEEN THE FOREST SERVICE 
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND 
THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 



This MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING mode thig 11 th day of July, 1966, by and 
between the NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, U. S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, 
hereinafter referred to as the Park Servfce, acting pursuant to the Act of 
April 11, 1956 (70 Stat. 105), represented by the Superintendent, Curecantl 
Recreation Area, National Park Service, and the FOREST SERVICE, U. S. 
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, hereinafter referred to as the Forest Service, 
acting pursuant to the Act of June 4, 1897 (30 Stat. 35), as amended, and 
in accordance with the letter from the Secretary of Agriculture to 
Secretary of Interior dated September 27, 1957, represented by the Forest 
Supervisor, Gunnison National Forest. 

WHEREAS, Curecantl Unit of the Upper Colorado River Storage Project 
has a great public recreation potential; and 

WHEREAS, Congressional action is expected, to the effect that, for the 

purpose of developing the Curecantl Recreation Area to its full recreation 

potential for the benefit and enjoyment of the public, the area be classified 
as a National Recreation Area; and 

WHEREAS, only a very minor part of the Curecantl Recreation Area and 
the lands withdrawn by the U. S. Bureau of Reclamation for construction of 
the Curecantl Project are National Forest lands; and 

WHEREAS, the Park Service will plan, construct, maintain and administer 
the public recreation developments on the shoreline with only a minor 
exception in the small instance where the reservoirs encroach on National 
Forest lands; and 

WHEREAS, It is highly desirable for one agency to plan, construct, 
maintain and administer the entire public recreation complex around the 
Reservoirs; and 

WHEREAS, the Park Service is desirous of doing the planning, 
construction, maintenance and administration of the public recreation 
facilities to be developed on the Forest Service lands within the withdrawal 
area of the Reservoirs; and 

WHEREAS, the Forest Service Is desirous to make available to the Park 
Service for development of public recreation facilities those National 
Forest lands which are within the withdrawal area of the Reservoirs. 



45 



NOW Tii£REFORE, the parties agree as follows: 



A. THE FOREST SERVICE: 



1. Grants the Park Service, subject to all valid claims and possible 
future Congressional or other legal classification of the Curecanti 

"Recreation area as a National. Recreation Area, use of the following 
described Forest Service lands to plan, construct, maintain and administer 
public recreation facilities as detailed in Section B, Paragraph 2, of 
this MEMORANDUM. 

T. 49 N., R. 4 W., N.M.P.M. 

Section 8 NE^NE^ 

Section 9 SW&NEfc, KW&IE&IWfc, S-^NE^NWfc, NWfcNWfc 

S*»NWfc, SW%, KEUE%i W^SEfc 

T. 49 N., R. 6 W. , N.M.P.M. 

Section 29 W^W% 

2. Will allow the Park Service to survey, design, construct and 
maintain a road on Forest Service lands lying within the Blue Mesa Reservoir 
withdrawal area, the termini of this road being Forest Development Road 
v721 and the eastern most extent of the Blue Mesa Reservoir withdrawal 
area in the NE&Efc of Section 9, T. 49 N. , R. 4 W., N.M.P.M. 



B. THE PARK SERVICE: 

1. Will assume the fire protection responsibilities of those lands 
described in Section A, Paragraph 1, from the date of acceptance of this 
Memorandum to the date the Blue Mesa Reservoir area by Congressional or 
other legal action becomes a National Recreation Area, or until this 
Memorandum is terminated by mutual consent of both the Park Service and the 
Forest Service. 

2. Will not develop or construct any improvements on National Forest 
land described herein during the life of this Memorandum other than those 
which are specifically mentioned below without the concurrence of the 
Forest Service. Those improvements which are specifically agreed to as a 
part of this Memorandum are: necessary access roads and trails, campground 
facilities and a boat docks 

3. Agrees that all land line surveys and boundary fencing needed in 
the exercise of this Memorandum will be the responsibility of the Park 
Service. 



46 



A. Will transfer to the Unit Collection Officer, Cunnison National 
Forest, money collected on National Forest lands administered by the Park 
Service under the terns and conditions of this Memorandum for deposit in 
the National Forest Fund. The frequency of transfer of said receipts to 
be mutually determined by the Park Service and the Forest Sercice, Provided, 
that all such transfers are made at least annually with last SF-1081 voucher 
for each fiscal year being submitted to the Forest Service not later than 
June 10. 



C. THE PARK SERVICE AND FOREST SERVICE MUTUALLY AGREE THAT: 

1. This Memorandum may be amended or modified by an exchange of 
correspondence between the parties thereto. 

2 . The Memorandum shall auto matically termina_t_e_upon receipt by the 
Forcst^J^ervi ce of~~w rTt^ji__action from" t he Park Service (1) that the l.-.nds 
within the terms of this Memorandum are no longer needed for the intended 
purpose, or (2) tha t the pro p osed recla ssification of the Blue Mesa 
Reservo ir area has be en legally ^authorized by Congress or other legal 
auth o rity . If this Memorandum is canTe^Ted~T>y~th - e exe~rcise ofThe" pTrk 
Service, said Park Service will within one (1) year remove or rehabilitate 
all structures and other developments in a manner acceptable to the Forest 
Service. 

3. The liability of the parties under the Memorandum is contingent 
upon the necessary appropriations and reservation of funds being made 
therefore. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the Parties have signed this Memorandum as of the day 
and year first above written. 



THE FOREST SERVICE 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 



/? 



J Arthur Martin 
Forest Supervisor 
Gunnison National Forest 



THE NATIONAL-sPARK SERVICE 
U. S ./ DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR 




W 




nry R. /During 
perintendent 
Curecantr Recreation Area 



He 
Sup 



47 



Reaffirmation Memorandum 

Cooperative Agreement 
Between 



The USDA Forest Service The National Park Servie 

Gunnison National Forest and Curecanti National Recreation 

Area 



We, the undersigned, have the authority and do hereby reaffirm the 
cooperative agreement between the National Park Service and the USDA 
Forest Service for the purpose of administering the following described 
USDA Forest lands for recreational activities: 

T. 49N., R. AW. , N.M.P.M. 

Section 8 NE*fiNE*$ 

Section 9 SW*jNE*s, NW^NESfiNW^, S^NEHNW^ 

NW*sNW*s, S^NW 1 ^, SW 1 -*, NE'-sSE 1 -*, 

W^SEJj; 
T. 49N., R. 6W., N.M.P.M. 
Section 29 iWs 

This original agreement was signed by Henry R. During for the National 
Park Service and J. Arthur Martin for the USDA Forest Service and dated 
July 11, 1966. Said agreement and all its terms and conditions is to 
continue in effect for an additional 5 years from September 1, 1979 
until September 1, 1984 with options for renewal at the end of that 
period. 



"dLJjMz. <'< L± 



Name and Title 
National Park Service 




vtf^ and/' 
National ', 



.d/Tltle 




Forest Service 
Grand Mesa, Uncompahgre ,. and Gunnison National Forests 



48 



i 

INTERAGENCY AGREEMENTS TASK FORCE REPORT 
Title of Agreement: Memorandum of Understanding 



Parties to Agreement: USFS, NPS 



Purpose of Agreement: cooperative land management 

Brief Summary: Alloys NPS to manage, protect and develop 670 acres of USFS 
land on the Soap Creek Arm and on Crystal Reservoir at Curecanti NRA. M 1 ovs 
NFS to survey and construct road and construct and maintain public recreation 
f acili ties. 

Effective Period of Agreement: Beginning Date Sept. 1979 

Termination Date Sept. 1954 

LEGAL CLASSIFICATION 

( ) Agreement mandated by legal authority. (Citation) 

(If yes, attach copy of the law, order, directive, etc.) 

( ) Agreement not mandated. 



VALUE RATING 

( ) Agreement is beneficial to my Agency. If yes, how? (Use 
back of this fcrm. ) 

( ) Agreement not beneficial to my Agency. 

( ) Agreement is detrimental to my Agency.- If yes, how? 
(Use back of this form. ) 



RECOMMENDATION 



Agency Contact Phone 



Definition of Agreement - Any commitment, directive to, or other under- 
standing involving any Interior Agency which 
requires spending time or money, providing 
or exchanging information, services or products, 
or a commitment to delay a decision or action 
until the other party concurs or comments. 
Agreements may include required consultations, 
formal written agreements, MOUs, letters of 
commitment, etc. Also include committees, 
teams, And working groups without written 
charters. 

49 



I J I : f. If 



.f 



" .v-vA ;.<n of Ui,l:r:Jv.ili;ig for the Nat 
''70 Acres of U.S. Forest Service L-md 



nil Park Service to *•' -r.aje 



?. ;■/■.:< i i.ks 10 'J UK A' ; Ri-:;-::'r.Nr 






'' - f -5 



Curecanti national Recreation Area, National Park Service 
and the Cunnison National Forest, U.S. Forest Service 



DA I'K OF AO'RKKMKNT 
July 11, 1966 



' '. *i ,' »'. •<■ '. >' - 



'♦. oKtKF DESCRIPTION OF AC.RKKMKNT 



5. 



Frovides for the national Park Service to manage, protect and develop 
6'fO acres of U.S. Forest Service land within the U.S. Bureau of 
Reclamation withdrawal area on Bine Mesa Reservoir on the Soap Creek 
Arm and on Crystal Reservoir. Allows the UPS to survey, design, cons 
and maintain a road from Forest Service Development Read ii'[21 
(Soap Creek Road) to near the" "mouth of Coal Creek" near the eastern - 
extent of the Blue Mesa Reservoir withdrawal area. On' this land, the 
UPS may plan , construct, maintain arid administer public recreation - 
facilities . , ,-.,■>.. ,.......- 



Indefinite; until lands no longer needed for the ?Iational Park Service 
or when Blue Mesa Reservoir is reclassified. 



V-*> \>r. 



r.NTS (IF ARY) A.RD ^k'lCS 



none 



7. ir:srO:;srBr.K ci.-ri.cr: (V;r-'. : :h: A0.<HrM.-.\"r is \. 



0) 



Curecanti National Recreation Area, National Park Service 



\ 

" y\a';uce red typed n....-.f2 of official 
•'■::i v 'i. fr.g tin's report 

James W. Packard, Superintendent. 



V 



Date 



i/istic,- 



50 



SECOND REAFFIRMATION OF MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING 

DATED JULY 11, 1966 BETWEEN 

USDI -NATIONAL PARK SERVICE AND USDA-FOREST SERVICE 

RELATED TO RECREATION ADMINISTRATION OF THE CURECANTI 

NATIONAL RECREATION AREA ON NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM LANDS 



NOW WHEREAS, as provided for 1n Section I.C., We* the undersigned, have the 
authority and do hereby amend, modify and re-aff1rm the cooperative 
arrangements and agreements cited 1n the above Memorandum of Understanding 
(MOU) between the two agencies for administering the following described 
National Forest System lands for public recreational purposes: 

T.49M., R.4W., NMPM, Gunnison County, Colorado 

Section 8: NE1/4NE1/4, NW1/4NE1/4, SE1/4NE1/4 

Section 9: SW1/4NE1/4, NW1/4NE1/4NW1/4, S1/2NE1/4NW1/4, 
NW1/4NW1/4, S1/2NW1/4, Sl/2 

T.49N..R.6W.. NMPM, Gunnison County, Colorado 

Section 29: W1/2W1/2 

as more particularly shown on the attached Exhibit A map 

NOW WHEREAS, the original MOU was signed by Henry R. During for the National 
Park Service and by J. Arthur Martin for the Forest Service, dated July 11, 
1966. 

AND WHEREAS, the first reaffirmation of said MOU was signed by Glenn D. 
Alexander for the Park Service and by Jimmy R. W1lk1ns for the Forest Service, 
dated October 22, 1979 to continue the MOU for 5 years or to September 1, 1984. 

NOW THEREFORE, said MOU and all of Its agreements, terms and conditions 1s to 
hereby continue from September 2, 1984 to December 31, 1990, with options to 
renew or reaffirm at the end of that period. 

SEPH F. ALSTON, Superintendent RAYMOND J. EV/NS, Forest 



JOSEPH F. ALSTON, Superintendent 
Curecantl National Recreation Area 
USDI- National Park Service 



Forest Supervisor 
Grand Mesa, Uncompahgre and 
Gunnison National Forests 
USDI- Forest Service 



£2i&i 



DATE 




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